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Osei Nuamah

2 months ago

THEY CALLING US TRAITORS BECAUSE WE REFUSED TO BE SLAVES FOR MAHAMA- KOKU AYINDOHO

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News

2 months ago

Former Deputy General Secretary of the opposition National Democratic Congress, koku Ayindoho, has once again launched a scathing attack on former President John Dramanai Mahama.


According to the former deputy general secretary of the party, himself and the former Central Regional Chairman of the party, Bernard Allotey Jacobs, have been labeled as traitors simply because they refuse to become slaves to the former president.



In one of a series of tweets, Koku shared a picture of himself and Allotey Jacobs mourning the death of the late President John Atta -Mills noting that they are one of the few people who continue to honor the legacy of the late president.


“Today, they call us traitors, because we respect the memory of the late President and REFUSE to be slaves to John Dramani Maham,” he wrote.


In other tweets, Koku used several harsh words on Mr. Mahama and went on to say that the former president hates him for showing his love to the late President Mills.

“I don’t have the energy to waste hating John Dramani Maham (not worth my time); it is John Mahana who HATES me bitterly for loving President Atta-Mills,” he wrote.



Koku Ayindoho and Allotey jacobs have fallen out with the current leadership of the NDC.


The two have over the period been critical of former President Mahama and his leadership of the party as its flagbearer for the 2020 elections.


Also read on my previous article;


Stephen Gillen was just 14 when he first experienced life behind bars. A product of the care home system, he became a hardened criminal, mixing with the worst of the worst and ending up spending 17 long years in some of Britain's most high-security prisons.


It was there that he was put through what he would call "the seven levels of hell", under constant observation and the threat of violence.



Now free from prison and married with kids, Stephen uses his experiences to try and stop others from going down the same road that he did.


Born in England and raised by an aunt in Ireland, Gillen grew up in Belfast at the height of the troubles in the 1970s.

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